From Puerto Natales to Ushuaia by bus

Ushuaia View

Ushuaia View

It was now time for our bus trip to Ushuaia in Argentina. We searched around for a bit and found one that would take approximately 14 hours to get us from Puerto Natales to Argentina, with one short stop along the way. It departed at 7 a.m, which was fine with us. When you’re on vacation you’re used to waking up early anyway. The last thing you want to do is waste a vacation sleeping!
So we were finally off to Argentina, where our 11 day cruise to Antarctica would begin.  Earlier while in Bariloche, we had contacted the Antarctic cruise companies about this cruise, and at the time they had said that they were booked solid for the next half a year, which really sent our hearts sinking. We put our names in for reserve spots if anyone happened to cancel, and sure enough someone did! We felt really blessed to get those cruise spots. It wasn’t one of the cheaper ones, but we were thrilled nonetheless. This had been one of the planned star attractions of our journey to the southern hemisphere, and it still would be.

Bus Station in Puerto Natales

Bus Station in Puerto Natales

Back to the bus trip, and it worked out quite well that the trip took place during the day, as the countryside offered a wide range of different sights that we really enjoyed. Some people like their bus trips at night so they can sleep, but I wouldn’t want to miss this for some lousy sleep, that’s for sure. The other reason this route can’t travel during the night is that the road can be quite dicey in spots, and the weather has a rather unpredictable nature. We passed through the Land of Fire (Tierra del Fuego), so named by Darwin, when he first explored this region in the 1800’s. This was because of all the fires that were lit to keep the locals warm. The natives were known to be barely clothed, if at all, so you can imagine they’d need as many sources of warmth as they could manage. As we got close to our destination, there was another brief trip of the east-west running Andes, which normally runs north-south. And so our journey through this region came to a dramatic climax, and we

prepared for a new one over the icy waters of the Antarctic.